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2010 Hill of Roses

RRP:
$380.00

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Region
Eden Valley
Description

Deep crimson with brick red hues. Spicy and fragrant Satsuma plums are carried by cracked black peppercorns, fresh bay leaf and charcuterie; supported by enchanting notes of mocha and cedar oak. Rich and soft blackberry and blueberry fruit fills the palate, woven with anise, bay leaf, Dutch cocoa and black pepper, finishing long and complex with lingering silky tannins.

Is it worth the price? Yes, absolutely. It is entirely sourced from the Hill of Grace Vineyard. You are buying history. You are buying part of the most valuable land in Australia, as rare as Romanee-Conti in Burgurdy, both in reality beyond price or value because they will never be for sale at any price. The use of 100% French oak gives the wine an additional point of difference from Hill of Grace, in which American oak still plays a minor role. This to one side, the wine has superb colour, a racy, superfine palate of exceptional length, and the balance that is endowed by that length.

James Halliday, Halliday Wine Companion 2018
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Limit of 6 per person.

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Product Information

Vintage
2010
Grape varieties
  • 100% Shiraz
Technical Details
Alcohol
14.5%
pH
3.54
Acidity
6.6g/L
Bottle Size
750mL
Harvest Date
25 March
Maturation
Matured in 60% new and 40% seasoned French oak hogsheads for 18 months prior to bottling.
Viticulture
The Henschke vineyards are nurtured under biodynamic principles
Background
This wine is named as a tribute to Johann Gottlieb Rosenzweig, one of the early Barossa Lutheran pioneers who settled at Parrot Hill in Eden Valley. Their toil, perseverance and conservatism in hardship has meant the many generations that followed have rejoiced in the riches of those efforts. Shiraz, growing on the fertile slopes in the Eden Valley region, is just one of those blessings. The wine was produced from a small selection of low-yielding dry-grown shiraz vines from the Hill of Grace vineyard, named the Post Office block, that were a mere 21 years old at the time of picking and therefore considered too young for inclusion into Hill of Grace Shiraz. The quality of the grapes from this selection produced a wine that was too good to be declassified and warranted a separate bottling and limited release. The Post Office ruins are on the land that was previously Rosenzweig property, the Rosenzweig name translating from German to ‘rose twig’.
Serving Temperature
17°C
Cellaring potential
Exceptional vintage, 30+ years (from vintage).
Download tasting notes
2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2002
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Vintage Description

The 2010 growing season was preceded by above average winter rainfall. Spring was mild with little frost damage and gave us an even budburst. The weather remained cold and wet through spring, which held back growth until a two-week high 30s heat wave in November affected flowering and fruit set. Spring rains continued into early summer right through until mid-December, making it the wettest year since 2005. The vines responded to the heat and grew vigorously until early January, developing lush canopies, but bunch development
suffered as a result.
A roller-coaster ride of heat spikes and cool changes continued through a warm summer with occasional thunderstorms. The vines went through veraison a week earlier than 2009. Lower yields coupled with the mild ripening period resulted in concentrated fruit. Vintage began a week earlier than 2009 and was in full swing by mid-February. The white vintage was all but finished a month later while the red harvest continued with deeply coloured, well-balanced grapes being picked during mild, dry conditions until the end of April.

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Recommended Food Pairing

Wild Hare with Field Mushrooms

Reviews

Matthew Jukes MATTHEWJUKES.COM

November, 2017

“The first vintage was 2001. Just a few barrels are made each year from younger vines which have been massale- selected from Hill of Grace and planted in a block next door. Getting very close to [Hill of Grace] density, but not quite there. Great nose, very fresh finish and actually quite elegant.”

18.5
James Halliday Halliday Wine Companion 2018

August, 2017

"Is it worth the price? Yes, absolutely. It is entirely sourced from the Hill of Grace Vineyard. You are buying history. You are buying part of the most valuable land in Australia, as rare as Romanee-Conti in Burgurdy, both in reality beyond price or value because they will never be for sale at any price. The use of 100% French oak gives the wine an additional point of difference from Hill of Grace, in which American oak still plays a minor role. This to one side, the wine has superb colour, a racy, superfine palate of exceptional length, and the balance that is endowed by that length."

98
Nick Stock JamesSuckling.com

May, 2017

Plenty of exotic, ripe and exuberant fruits. Fresh leather notes on the nose, prominent spices and woody notes. The blackberry and redder-tinged berry fruits are strong on both nose and palate. The structure is fine, crisp and elegant. It’s a long and fluid sensation with impressive focus and purity.

95
Huon Hooke HuonHooke.com

May, 2017

Deep red with the merest tinge of purple as well as brick-red. Very intense and complex fragrance, very like Hill of Grace (HoG): dried herbs, eucalyptus forest floor, raspberry and blueberry, some Ribena and canned corn nuances. Very good flavour, but it doesn’t have the backbone of HoG. Lovely wine, approachable now and will mature sooner than HoG. Very intense fruit and sweet, succulent, gorgeous mouth-feel. Delicious wine and a real ‘little brother’ for HoG. (Made from young vines on the Hill of Grace vineyard)

95
Tony Love Adelaide Advertiser

April, 2017

The Henschke Hill of Roses 2010 Shiraz ($380) is the result of Prue’s lifetime work to continue the genetic pool of grandmother vines by selecting the best and replanting them in the same vineyard. The tiny volume of this wine asks the question about young vines versus old vines – but perhaps doesn’t answer it, not yet anyway. It’s a deep, dark blackberry-fruited shiraz, just revealing a little aged character while the oak remains an influence in the spice notes.

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