2016 Hill of Roses

RRP:

$415.00

  |  

 

Eden Valley

Deep crimson with violet hues. Entrancing aromas of spicy star anise, black pepper, sage, bay and tarragon add complexity to blueberry, mulberry, blackberry and black plum, anise, violets and cedar. Concentrated flavours of spicy, crushed mulberry, blueberry, and black pepper are balanced by gentle acidity and velvety, layered tannins creating depth, structure and excellent length.

Out of Stock

Product Information

Vintage
2016
Grape variety breakdown

100% Shiraz

Technical Details
Alcohol: 14.5% | pH:

3.45

| Acidity:

6.11g/L

| Volume: 750mls

Harvest Date

14 March

Maturation

Matured in 30% new and 70% seasoned French hogsheads for 18 months prior to blending and bottling.

Background

Hill of Roses is named as a tribute to Johann Gottlieb Rosenzweig, one of the early Barossa Lutheran pioneers who settled at Parrot Hill in the Eden Valley. Their toil, perseverance and conservatism in hardship has meant the many generations that followed have rejoiced in the riches of those efforts. The wine is produced from a small selection of low-yielding, dry-grown shiraz vines from the Hill of Grace vineyard, named the Post Office block, that were a mere 12 years old when the wine was first produced in 2001 and therefore considered too young for inclusion into Hill of Grace Shiraz. The Barossa Old Vine Charter states that a Barossa Old Vine is equal to or greater than 35 years of age. The quality of the grapes however, warranted a separate bottling and limited release, and continue to do so. The historic Parrot Hill Post Office ruins overlooking the vineyard are on the land that was previously Rosenzweig property, the Rosenzweig name translating from German to ‘rose twig’.

Cellaring potential

Exceptional vintage; 30+ years (from vintage).

Serving Temperature

17°C

Download Tasting Notes

2016
2015
2014
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2001

Vintage Description

The 2016 vintage began with well below-average winter rainfall, followed by a warm and dry spring, which enhanced flowering and set to give average to above-average yield potential. Low disease pressure was maintained by one of the hottest Decembers on record, though temperatures cooled down in the New Year and rainfall around veraison in late January brought relief to the dry-grown, old-vine Eden Valley vineyards. This was followed by further rainfall in early March which eased the stress on all varieties. The fruit matured with an earlier harvest, as predicted due to an early Easter. Open, light and airy vine canopies allowed for good flavour, sugar and colour and mature tannins to develop at harvest, which was overall characterised by average yields but very high quality.

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