2017 Hill of Roses

RRP:

$430.00

  |  

 

Eden Valley

Medium garnet with garnet hues. Perfumed aromas of garden florals, blueberry, blackberry, raspberry compote and red currant, supported by musk, star anise and crushed herbs, with hints of violet and cedar. A concentrated core of plush red plum and raspberry on the palate, layered with blackberry, blueberry, anise, musk and black pepper. Textural, mature, velvety tannins carry an elegantly long finish.


Product Information

Vintage
2017
Grape variety breakdown

100% Shiraz

Technical Details
Alcohol: 14.5% | pH:

3.60

| Acidity:

6.04g/L

| Volume: 750mls

Harvest Date

28 April

Maturation

Matured in 25% new and 75% seasoned (89% French, 11% American) oak hogsheads for 18 months prior to blending and bottling.

Background

Hill of Roses is named as a tribute to Johann Gottlieb Rosenzweig, one of the early Barossa Lutheran community who settled at Parrot Hill in the Eden Valley. Their toil, perseverance and conservatism in hardship has meant the many generations that followed have rejoiced in the riches of those efforts. The wine is produced from a small selection of low-yielding, dry-grown shiraz vines from the Hill of Grace Vineyard, planted in 1989 and named the Post Office Block. These vines were a mere 12 years old when the wine was first produced in 2001 and therefore considered too young for inclusion into Hill of Grace Shiraz. The Barossa Old Vine Charter states that a Barossa Old Vine is equal to or greater than 35 years of age. The quality of the grapes however, warranted a separate bottling and limited release, and continue to do so. The historic Parrot Hill Post Office ruins overlooking the vineyard are on the land that was previously Rosenzweig property, the Rosenzweig name translating from German to ‘rose twig’.

Cellaring potential

Exceptional vintage; 30+ years (from vintage).

Serving Temperature

17°C

Download Tasting Notes

2017
2016
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2001

Vintage Description

A later start to picking and a mild period of ripening finished with the last grapes being picked in mid-May. A wet 2016 winter gave us a good foundation for our predominantly dry-grown vines on their own roots, and a cool, wet and fiercely windy spring followed, with a slightly higher spring rainfall than the Barossa Valley, which delayed flowering, though conditions during set meant that yields were at average levels. A mild summer with regular rainfall events followed, which allowed the grapes to reach full physiological maturity. The significant rainfall events largely missed our area and therefore we harvested the majority of our grapes in healthy condition. As always, careful hand picking in the vineyard and sorting of grapes as they were processed made sure that quality was not compromised.

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